AISI S200-07 PDF

adminComment(0)

AISI S Standard and Commentary (1st Printing).pdf - Download as PDF File .pdf), Text File .txt) or read online. Prescriptive Method for One and Two Family Dwellings, Edition with AISI S, North American Standard for Cold-Formed Steel Framing – General. is anticipated that AISI will publish updates of this material as new information AISI S, North American Standard for Cold-Formed Steel Framing.


Aisi S200-07 Pdf

Author:ELDORA BAYGENTS
Language:English, Japanese, German
Country:Brazil
Genre:Personal Growth
Pages:288
Published (Last):04.02.2016
ISBN:268-4-19803-633-5
ePub File Size:30.55 MB
PDF File Size:20.10 MB
Distribution:Free* [*Sign up for free]
Downloads:47910
Uploaded by: DEEANNA

AISI S, the North American Standard for Cold-Formed Steel Framing – Product Data, S, American Iron and Steel Institute, Washington, DC, AISI S General Provisions *. – AISI S Product AISI S Floor and Roof System Design * . G, Using Chapter F of the NA Specification for the. is anticipated that AISI will publish updates of this material as new information As such, provisions formerly in AISI S (AISI, ) for material, corrosion.

AISI S200-07 Cold-Formed Steel Framing – General Provisions, Standard and Commentary

The designation of the minimum yield strength. Gusset Plate. A structural member used to facilitate the connection of truss chord or web members at a heel, ridge, other pitch break, or panel point. A singly-symmetric shape consisting of at least two vertical webs and a horizontal stiffened flange which is used as a chord member in a truss.

The connection region between the top and bottom truss chords of a non-parallel chord truss. A horizontal structural framing member used over floor, roof or wall openings to transfer loads around the opening to supporting structural framing members. Hold Down Anchor.

An anchor system that connects the wall or floor system to the wall below or to the foundation below and which primarily resists uplift forces due to wind or seismic events. Jack Stud. A stud that does not span the full height of the wall and provides bearing for headers. A structural member primarily used in floor and ceiling framing. King Stud. A stud, adjacent to a jack stud, that spans the full height of the wall and supports vertical and lateral loads. Light-Frame Construction.

Construction where the vertical and horizontal structural elements are primarily formed by a system of repetitive cold-formed steel or wood framing members. Limit States. Those conditions in which a structural member ceases to fulfill the function for AISI S which it was designed.

Those states concerning safety are called the ultimate limit states. The ultimate limit state for strength is the maximum load-carrying capacity. Limit states that restrict the intended use of a member for reasons other than safety, such as deflection and vibration are called serviceability limit states. Method of proportioning structural components members, connectors, connecting elements and assemblages such that no applicable limit state is exceeded when the structure is subjected to all appropriate load combinations.

That part of a framing member that extends from the flange as a stiffening element. Force or other action that results from the weight of building materials, occupants and their possessions, environmental effects, differential movement, or restrained dimensional changes.

Load Effect. Forces, stresses, and deformations produced in a structural component by the applied loads. Load Factor. Factor that accounts for deviations of the actual load from the nominal load, for uncertainties in the analysis that transforms the load into a load effect, and for the probability that more than one extreme load will occur simultaneously.

Method of proportioning structural components such that the design strength equals or exceeds the required strength of the component under the action of the LRFD load combinations.

The average of the roof eave height and the height to the highest point on the roof surface, except that eave height shall be used for roof angles less than or equal to 10 degrees 0. Multiple Span. The span made by a continuous member having intermediate supports. Nominal Load. Magnitude of the load specified by the applicable building code. Capacity of a structure or component to resist the effects of loads, determined in accordance with this Specification using specified material strengths and dimensions.

Strength of a structure or component without the resistance factor or safety factor to resist the load effects, as determined in accordance with this Specification. Panel Point. The connection region between a web and chord member. Pitch Break. The connection region between two truss chord members where there is a change in slope, excluding the heel.

SBC Magazine Main Menu

Plan Aspect Ratio. The ratio of the length longer dimension to the width shorter dimension of the building. Rake Overhang.

The horizontal projection of the roof measured from the outside face of a gable endwall to the outside edge of the roof. Repetitive Framing. A framing system where the wall, floor and roof structural members are spaced no greater than 24 inches mm on center.

Larger spaces are permitted at openings where the structural loads are transferred to headers or lintels and supporting studs, joists or rafters. Required Strength. Forces, stresses, and deformations produced in a structural component, determined by either structural analysis, for the LRFD or ASD load combinations, as appropriate, or as specified by this Specification or Standard.

Factor that accounts for unavoidable deviations of the actual strength from the nominal strength [nominal value] and for the manner and consequences of failure. The horizontal line formed by the joining of the top edges of two upward sloping roof surfaces.

Rim Track. A horizontal structural member that is connected to the end of a floor joist. Roof Rafter.

A horizontal or sloped, structural member that supports roof loads. Safety Factor. Factor that accounts for the desired level of safety, including deviations of the actual load from the nominal load and uncertainties in the analysis that transforms the load into a load effect, in determining the nominal strength and for the manner and consequences of failure.

Classification assigned to a building based upon its importance and the severity of the design earthquake ground motion at the building site as given in the applicable building code. Shear Wall. Wall that provides resistance to lateral loads in the plane of the wall and provides stability for the structural system. Single Span. The span made by one continuous structural member without any intermediate supports. The clear horizontal distance between bearing supports.

Specified Load. Magnitude of the load specified by the applicable building code, not including load factors. A load or series of loads that are supported by or are applied to a structure so gradually that forces caused by change in momentum of the load and structural elements can be neglected and all parts of the system at any instant are essentially in equilibrium.

Steel Sheet.

A thin steel panel used in lieu of structural sheathing for wall bracing applications. Strap Bracing. Steel straps, applied diagonally to form a vertical truss that form part of the lateral force resisting system. Strength Design. Also known as load and resistance factor design, an out-dated term used in some reference documents. Member, connector, connecting element or assemblage. Structural Member.

A member that resists design loads [factored loads], as required by the applicable building code, except when defined as a non-structural member. The covering e. They do not apply to stainless steels or to nonferrous metals whose stress—strain curves and some other characteristics of structural behavior are substantially different from those of carbon and low-alloy steels.

For the design of stainless steel structural members, see Ref. It should also be noted that at the present time there are standardized sizes for studs, joists, channels, and tracks produced by member companies of the Steel Stud Manufacturers Association SSMA. They are included primarily as a guide for design. In some other countries, the cold-formed steel shapes may be standardized. The standardization of shapes would be convenient for the designer, but it may be limiting for particular applications and new developments.

For the edition of the Specification, the AISI Commentary, prepared by Wei-Wen Yu, contained a brief presentation of the characteristics and the performance of cold-formed steel members, connections, and systems.

A cross reference was provided between various provisions and the published research data. The Commentary on the edition of the North American Specification1. In the Commentary on the edition of the North American Specification, comprehensive discussions with extensive references are included for the new provisions, particularly for Appendices 1 and 2.

For details, see Ref. The uses of these standards for residential and commercial construction are discussed in Chapter Design specifications and recommendations are now available in Australia and New Zealand,1. Some of the recommendations are based on LSD. The design of cold-formed steel sections is also covered in Refs.

With regard to research work, many other institutions have conducted numerous extensive investigations in the past.

References 1. Comparisons between various design rules are presented in Refs. The following is a brief discussion of some considerations usually encountered in design. Local buckling of such elements is therefore one of the major design considerations. It is well known that such elements will not necessarily fail when their buckling stress is reached and that they often will continue to carry increasing loads in excess of that at which local buckling first appears.

Figure 1. These pictures illustrate why the postbuckling strength of compression elements is utilized in design.

Related titles

Prior to , different procedures were used in the AISI Specification for the design of beams and columns with different types of compression elements. The current design methods for beams, columns, and beam—columns are discussed in Chapters 4, 5, and 6, respectively.

You might also like: ATITHI SHIKSHAK FORM PDF MP

During recent years, distortional buckling has been considered as one of the important limit states for the design of cold-formed steel beams and columns having edge-stiffened compression flanges.

New design provisions have been added in the current North American specification. For details, see Chapters 4, 5, and Because the torsional rigidity of open sections is proportional to t 3 , cold-formed steel sections consisting of thin elements are relatively weak against torsion. In this case, the shear center is outside the web and the applied load initiates rotation. Since cold-formed steel sections are relatively thin and in some sections the centroid and shear center do not coincide, torsional—flexural buckling may be a critical factor for compression members.

In addition, distortional buckling may govern the design for certain members used as beams or columns. Provisions for the design of such stiffeners have been developed from previous research. However, this type of stiffener generally is not practical in hot-rolled shapes and built-up members. GENERAL A1 Scope This standard shall apply to the design and installation of structural members and nonstructural members utilized in cold-formed steel framing applications where the specified minimum base steel thickness is between 18 mils 0.

Elements not specifically addressed by this standard shall be constructed in accordance with applicable building code requirements or an approved design. This standard shall not preclude the use of other materials, assemblies, structures or designs not meeting the criteria herein, when the other materials, assemblies, structures or designs demonstrate equivalent performance for the intended use to those specified in this standard. Where there is a conflict between this standard and other reference documents the requirements contained within this standard shall govern.

This standard shall include Sections A through E inclusive. A2 Definitions Where the following terms appear in this standard in italics they shall have the meaning herein indicated.

AISI S200-07 Standard and Commentary (1st Printing).pdf

Terms included in square brackets shall be specific to LSD terminology. Where a country is indicated in square brackets following the definition, the definition shall apply only in the country indicated. Terms not defined in Section A2 shall have the ordinary accepted meaning for the context for which they are intended. Adjusted Shear Resistance. In Type II shear walls, the unadjusted shear resistance multiplied by the shear resistance adjustment factor.

Method of proportioning structural components such that the allowable strength equals or exceeds the required strength of the component under the action of the ASD load combinations. Load combination in the applicable building code intended for allowable stress design allowable strength design.

Also known as allowable strength design, an out-dated term used in some reference documents. The building code under which the building is designed. Approved by the authority having jurisdiction or design professional. Available Strength. Design Strength or allowable strength, as appropriate. The average elevation of the finished ground level adjoining the building at all exterior walls. Base Steel Thickness. The thickness of bare steel exclusive of all coatings.

Bearing Stiffener. Additional material that is attached to the web to strengthen the member against web crippling. Also called a web stiffener. C-shaped, track, break shape, or flat strap material attached to structural members, AISI S flat strap or sheathing panels to transfer shear forces. Boundary Member. Diaphragm and shear wall boundary member to which the diaphragm transfers forces. Boundary members include chords and drag struts at diaphragm and shear wall perimeters, interior openings, discontinuities and re-entrant corners.

Braced Wall Line. A wall that is constructed to resist racking from seismic or wind forces and that contains a series of Type I braced wall panels or Type II braced walls. Structural elements that are installed to provide restraint or support or both to other framing members so that the complete assembly forms a stable structure. Building Designer. Also referred to as design professional and registered building designer, but hereinafter referred to as building designer, is an individual or organization responsible for the overall building design in accordance with the statutes and regulations governing the professional registration and certification of architects or engineers of the jurisdiction where the building will be located.

Ceiling Joist. A horizontal structural member that supports ceiling components and which may be subject to attic loads. Member of a shear wall or diaphragm that forms the perimeter, interior opening, discontinuity or re-entrant corner.

Chord Member.

A structural member that forms the top or bottom component of a truss. Chord Splice. The connection region between two truss chord members where there is no change in slope. Chord Stud. Clip Angle. An L-shaped short piece of steel normally with a degree bend typically used for connections. Cold-Formed Sheet Steel. Sheet steel or strip steel that is manufactured by 1 press braking blanks sheared from sheets or cut length of coils or plates, or by 2 continuous roll forming of cold- or hot-rolled coils of sheet steel; both forming operations are performed at ambient room temperature, that is, without any addition of heat such as would be required for hot forming.

Cold-Formed Steel. See Cold-Formed Sheet Steel. Collector Also known as a drag strut, member that serves to transfer forces between diaphragms and members of the lateral force resisting system. See structural component.

Combination of structural elements and joints used to transmit forces between two or more members. Cripple Stud.

A stud that is placed between a header and a window or door head track, a header and wall top track, or a window sill and a bottom track to provide a backing to attach finishing and sheathing material. A cold-formed steel shape used for structural and non-structural members consisting of a web, two 2 flanges and two 2 lips edge stiffeners. Curtain Wall.

Cold-Formed Steel Design, 4th Edition

Deflection Track. A track manufactured with extended flanges and used at the top of a wall to North American Standard For Cold-Formed Steel Framing - General Provisions provide for vertical movement of the structure, independent of the wall stud. Design Load. An individual who is registered or licensed to practice their respective design profession as defined by the statutory requirements of the state, province or territory in which the project is to be constructed.

Design Strength. Resistance Factor multiplied by the nominal strength, Rn. The steel thickness used in design.

Designation Thickness. The minimum base steel thickness expressed in mils and rounded to a whole number. Roof, floor or other membrane or bracing system that transfers in-plane forces to the lateral force resisting system. Eave Overhang.Track web depth measurements are taken to the inside of the flanges.

See structural component. A5 Products The material thickness of framing members, in their end-use, shall meet or exceed the minimum base steel thickness values given in an approved design or approved product standard, such as AISI S The average elevation of the finished ground level adjoining the building at all exterior walls.

Design Load. Load Factor. The clear horizontal distance between bearing supports. The thickness of bare steel exclusive of all coatings. This standard shall not preclude the use of other materials, assemblies, structures or designs not meeting the criteria herein, when the other materials, assemblies, structures or designs demonstrate equivalent performance for the intended use to those specified in this standard.

The section to be produced is relatively wide [usually more than 18 in.

KIRSTIN from Lexington
I love studying docunments coolly . Also read my other posts. I'm keen on slacklining.
>